Haunted: Invisible Illness

Due to a problem with my nervous system, I am disabled and chronically ill. My symptoms often become incorporated to my dreams, sometimes it’s almost funny: a man getting an electric foot massage on my back when the machine shorts out. (Okay, weird/scary, not that funny.) More often, it’s just me trying to keep up with the dream and sorely falling behind.

I just woke up from a miserable one. A repeater. Familiar people are telling me that I’m faking it. That I’m pretending to be weak to get attention. That I’m just irresponsible and lazy and need to try harder. Or worse, they roll their eyes and give one another a knowing smile like, “Won’t this be fun to dish about later?”

It’s bad enough to have to constantly having to explain what’s wrong with me and why I can’t do x, y, and/or z just like everyone else––but then to have convince them that you aren’t telling falsities, and to do so when your brain can’t even recall basic information reliably––I can’t explain how awful it is. How demoralizing. How it just makes a person want to give up.

But then to also do it every night in my dreams? Shiiiiiiit, this has to stop.

I clearly still have issues with people from my not-so-distant past, that’s where I can do work. Forgiveness. Self-love. Continuing to hang with empathetic folks.

But the real problem lies with society. The people in my dream aren’t “bad” guys. They are very “normal” people. We, as a society, still don’t have a strong understanding of invisible illness. (Even though it’s pretty darn common.) And we definitely aren’t aware of how to behave with empathy in regard to it.

Just because you can’t see a person’s pain doesn’t make it less real. To us who deal with invisible illness, it’s all the more real: because we’re so often received with disbelief and even bitterness in place of compassion. Can you imagine? No, like, really try to imagine.

Take a couple of minutes: Imagine waking up in agony, trying to shake off dreams like I just explained. Knowing that you have maybe 3-4 usable hours, that this agony is as good as you’ll feel all day, that it’s just going to get worse. Pushing through everything that you can get done despite your symptoms––which is never even close to the amount that needs to be done. As far as keeping up with life goes, you’re fucking drowning.

And then the pain levels rise so high that you can’t think straight. And then the fatigue levels get so high that just taking a bath is daunting. The television, and all sounds, feel abrasive; so all you can do is lie there until you feel tired enough to pass out despite the pain. But once you actually get to bed that’s rarely the case, as your memory foam feels like pavement––squishing your tender body and making it scream all the louder, a cacophony of miserable symptoms that you just have to lie there and bear. For hours. Every. Single. Night.

Imagine getting through a day and night like that, and then having someone say to you, “Man, I’m jealous––I wish I could stay at home all day!”

Do you see how demoralizing that could be to someone? It’s a private fucking hell, it’s truly awful. Not that my whole life is awful, but more days than not are indeed this bad, and all too often that’s people’s attitude. It really wipes my resting niceface right off, and totally screws up my “fake it ’till you make it” coping strategy.

But how can you really know if someone’s sick if they don’t look it?

WITH THEIR WORDS, dummy. LISTEN TO THEIR WORDS.

Trust the people in your life who tell you they’re not feeling well. Your reaction to someone else’s admittance of that, which often doesn’t happen until a breaking point––can have a HUGE impact on their life. Be the person that helps them find the right doctor. That googles their symptoms in-depth to help find answers. Or simply be the person that listens to what’s going on with them, instead of hurrying away uncomfortably or changing the subject.

We’re doing it all wrong when it comes to our attitudes about chronic illness, and it’s at the detriment of those of us already in a very precarious place. This is off-topic for the website, I know, but it’s really important to me––so I suppose my sharing here is fuckless.

Thanks for listening.

 

2 thoughts on “Haunted: Invisible Illness

  1. Oh!!! How I totally relate!!! I have multiple sclerosis, another autoimmune disorder that you can’t see and have many similarities to Fibromyalgia.
    Its hard to swallow when your own brother makes comments like “Your lazy, you make more out of it than what it is, your always sick!)
    Then my sister-in-law tells my husband and the rest of the family that there is nothing wrong with me I’m just riding the money train!
    Ugh!!! I wish for one day they could actually feel what my body does to me! Pain, dizziness, falling down like your drunk but haven’t been drinking! Or maybe something more embarrassing like peeing yourself as your walking to the bathroom in a public place, and then have a child point at you and speak up loudly “Hey mommy, that lady peed her pants” that was the most humiliating experience publicly yet!!!
    I totally get where your coming from and hopefully there will be an end to this way of thinking in generations to come but it seems like everyone wants to stereotype and its not just with someone’s illness….
    I have learned in life that “NOBODY CAN TAKE CARE OF ME BETTER THEN ME” but when I realized I am now dependent on my husband it felt like I lost Me, and I spent my life proving everyone wrong before I found out I had MS because I cut all my fingers off on my left hand the night before my high school graduation on a meat slicer at work! Yes, push through Is a great attitude to have but when the body decides there’s other physical ailments that you just can’t push through people will look down on you I’ve decided everyone’s entitled to an opinion and I could care less what theirs is. Learning who your real friends are and knowing who’s gonna be there when you actually need a friend or need help! My circle is become small but I’m much happier without fake friends!!!😍

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    1. Preach!! I’m so sorry for the late reply, missed it. Chronic illness is so misunderstood, it’s so frustrating. I hope things are looking up, filled with authentic folks who GET IT ❤❤

      Like

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